Tagged: Award

Volunteers for Museum Learning Award – Applications Now Open

Applications are now open for this year’s Volunteers for Museum Learning Award, presented by the British Museum and the Marsh Christian Trust.

The award celebrates the contribution of volunteers in museums, galleries and heritage sites all over the United Kingdom, recognising their achievements and dedication, as well as the innovative ways they are engaging with the visiting public. 

There will be twelve regional winners, each of whom will receive a £500 prize. Additionally, an overall national winner will receive a further £2000. The awards will be presented at the British Museum in September. Last year’s national winners were the Blaenafon Heritage Group Volunteers from Blaenavon Community Museum.

Volunteers are able to apply themselves or museums can apply on their behalf. Multiple entries from the same museum, gallery or heritage site are welcome. To submit an application please visit the British Museum website here. The closing date for applications is Friday 14 July 2017.

The Association for Heritage Interpretation Awards Deadline Extension

From AHI:

Good news…the deadline has been extended  to Friday 10th March to submit you entry

AHI 2017 Discover Heritage Awards, sponsored by Wessex Archaeology, it is time to think about your entry – if you haven’t already done so.

The 2015 awards generated a lot of interest and publicity for the organisations and projects that were shortlisted. This year we will host the awards ceremony in front of an international audience at the joint AHI and Interpret Europe conference.

This week AHI focus on two of the five categories in which you can enter your project, site or collection – Interpretation for a Target Audience, sponsored by Colour Heroes, and Museums and Historic properties/sites, sponsored by Minerva Heritage.

One of the 2015 site judges also provides a little advice on what to consider when creating ‘good interpretation’.

Interpretation for a Target Audience

This is for projects where you have identified the need to create an interpretive project for a specific audience. You may be creating something specific for audiences that already use your site, but perhaps you feel that you didn’t communicate to them effectively, or are actively reaching out to new audiences you wish to engage with more fully. Interpretation can be in any medium and be either on or off-site.

Colour Heroes provide bespoke retail, educational or visitor experience resources to captivate family audiences. They create tailor-made activity books, activity packs, trails, maps and guides – from concept through to completion.

“Thanks for your amazing award and kind words about our work. An award of this nature means a huge amount to a small company like ours. We’re delighted.”
Dean Paton, Big Heritage, 2015 category winner.

Museums and Historic properties/sites

This is for a project that is based upon a collection, building or property. A museum is defined as a collection-based organisation rather than the display of objects at a visitor centre. Projects that take collections off-site to places that are not visitor centres are also eligible, e.g.: to schools, roadshows, etc. An historic property/site could be a house, castle, industrial or archaeological site. Projects about extensive historic landscapes should be entered in the Landscapes, Forests, Nature Reserves, Parks and Gardens category, while more discrete sites, such as battlefields, can be entered in either category.

Minerva Heritage provide heritage management consultancy and services for archaeology, interpretation, learning and museums. They manage projects from the concept and research stage through to production and implementation.

“It’s absolutely fantastic to be the recipient of an AHI Award for Eltham Palace. It’s very valuable to us as individuals and as an organisation to have our peers in the sector recognise the projects we undertake.”
Rob Campbell, English Heritage, 2015 category winner.

A message from a site judge

Interpretation that stands out is when you can see that people have ‘dug deep’ to truly find the ‘nub’ of the story and develop a strong theme from that. Careful use of media is very important – so think about whether it adds or detracts from the visitor experience, especially if you are interpreting a special heritage site or an intricate object. Think carefully about digital media also – if you want to create a memorable and immersive experience, can you do that with visitors looking at a 7-inch screen in their palms? And if they can, why would they bother leaving their sofa?

View all the 2015 winners.

Learning Matters – North West Health and Care Awards 2017

The search is on for people and projects where individual and organisational learning is driving development and transforming the health and care sector in the North West. We want to hear about the part museums can and do play!

Health Education England and Voluntary Sector North West are particularly keen to receive nominations from museums which are working in partnership with either health and /or care partners to deliver innovative project work in the region and to understand this commitment to contributing to individual and community wellbeing. They would like to hear about museum innovation and the people who make this happen. They would also like to hear about how museum work is transforming the lives of the people you touch through your programmes and activity.

These awards will highlight what can be done to enable people to have the knowledge, skills and confidence to play an active role in managing their own health and wellbeing; and how through cross sector, collaborative working partners can effectively support communities and help them harness their assets.

If you want more information on award themes, award categories and how to get nominating now go to: https://www.vsnw.org.uk/nw-health-awards-2017

The North West Cultural Education Awards 2017

From Curious Minds:

We are excited to announce that we will soon be launching the North West Cultural Education Awards 2017. This event will celebrate outstanding work that happens within cultural organisations and schools/education settings, connecting children and young people with the region’s vibrant cultural offer.

A formal invite will follow soon, but in the meantime please save the date:Friday 28th April, 12pm-4pm. If you’d like to book tickets early to be sure of your place, you can do that here.

We’d like to encourage you to nominate your organisation, a young person, a school, Head Teacher or Governor for one of the following special awards:

Arts Award Special Achievement Categories

  • Young Achiever – This award aims to recognise someone as young as 7 or 8 years old who has achieved an Arts Award.
  • Gold and Beyond – This award is for someone who has gained a Gold Arts Award and used it to open up or progress onto new opportunities, education, or employment.
  • Personal Achievement – This award is for a young person who perhaps faces disadvantage or challenge in their lives but has overcome their circumstances and achieved an Arts Award.
  • Inspirational Adviser – This award is for young people to nominate their own adviser.
  • Big Impact Award – This award is for an organisation or individual who has found a new, successful way to embed Arts Award into a large-scale project, a curriculum or across a whole organisation.
  • Innovative Portfolio – This award is for a young person who has demonstrated a very creative way to collect their evidence.
  • New Settings Award – This award is for a young person or an organisation that has achieved Arts Award in a museum, a library or through a community/voluntary setting.

Schools and Cultural Education Categories

The Arts Council England Award for Innovation and Leadership in Cultural Education
This award recognises a school that is consistently demonstrating a leadership role, for example by delivering innovative CPD, supporting other schools with arts and culture, leading a network, developing high quality research into the impact of arts and culture or pioneering a new approach to cultural education.

Cultural Education Individual Leader Award
This award recognises a Head Teacher or Governor who enables cultural education to thrive in their school.

Cultural Education Partnership Awards

  • Library Partnership Award – to recognise an outstanding partnership between an education setting and a library.
  • Museum Partnership Award – to recognise an outstanding partnership between an education setting and a museum.
  • Arts Partnership Award – to recognise an outstanding partnership between an education setting and an arts organisation.
  • Inclusive Partnership Award – to recognise an outstanding partnership between a cultural organisation and a PRU or SEND setting.

Employment Categories

  • Most Inspiring Creative Apprentice or Intern – this award recognises the achievements of a young person currently undertaking or having recently undertaken an apprenticeship or internship in the creative and cultural sector.
  • Outstanding Creative Employer – to recognise an employer committed to providing a high quality, authentic work experience to young people.
  • Creative Career Champion of the Year – recognising a school or cultural organisation working to support young people to access pathways into creative careers.

The nomination process is quick and easy. You can nominate yourselves or any other individual, school, education setting or cultural organisation.

Place your nominations here: www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/NWCEA2017. The deadline for nominations is Friday 3rd March at 5pm.

The Association for Heritage Interpretation Awards

From AHI:

With 5 weeks to go before entries close in the AHI 2017 Discover Heritage Awards, sponsored by Wessex Archaeology, it is time to think about your entry – if you haven’t already done so.

The 2015 awards generated a lot of interest and publicity for the organisations and projects that were shortlisted. This year we will host the awards ceremony in front of an international audience at the joint AHI and Interpret Europe conference.

This week AHI focus on two of the five categories in which you can enter your project, site or collection – Interpretation for a Target Audience, sponsored by Colour Heroes, and Museums and Historic properties/sites, sponsored by Minerva Heritage.

One of the 2015 site judges also provides a little advice on what to consider when creating ‘good interpretation’.

Remember you have up to 11:59pm on the 28th February to enter the AHI 2017 Discover Heritage Awards.

Please forward this awards eBullletin to any non-members you think may have a great project they should enter.

Interpretation for a Target Audience

This is for projects where you have identified the need to create an interpretive project for a specific audience. You may be creating something specific for audiences that already use your site, but perhaps you feel that you didn’t communicate to them effectively, or are actively reaching out to new audiences you wish to engage with more fully. Interpretation can be in any medium and be either on or off-site.

Colour Heroes provide bespoke retail, educational or visitor experience resources to captivate family audiences. They create tailor-made activity books, activity packs, trails, maps and guides – from concept through to completion.

“Thanks for your amazing award and kind words about our work. An award of this nature means a huge amount to a small company like ours. We’re delighted.”
Dean Paton, Big Heritage, 2015 category winner.

Museums and Historic properties/sites

This is for a project that is based upon a collection, building or property. A museum is defined as a collection-based organisation rather than the display of objects at a visitor centre. Projects that take collections off-site to places that are not visitor centres are also eligible, e.g.: to schools, roadshows, etc. An historic property/site could be a house, castle, industrial or archaeological site. Projects about extensive historic landscapes should be entered in the Landscapes, Forests, Nature Reserves, Parks and Gardens category, while more discrete sites, such as battlefields, can be entered in either category.

Minerva Heritage provide heritage management consultancy and services for archaeology, interpretation, learning and museums. They manage projects from the concept and research stage through to production and implementation.

“It’s absolutely fantastic to be the recipient of an AHI Award for Eltham Palace. It’s very valuable to us as individuals and as an organisation to have our peers in the sector recognise the projects we undertake.”
Rob Campbell, English Heritage, 2015 category winner.

A message from a site judge

Interpretation that stands out is when you can see that people have ‘dug deep’ to truly find the ‘nub’ of the story and develop a strong theme from that. Careful use of media is very important – so think about whether it adds or detracts from the visitor experience, especially if you are interpreting a special heritage site or an intricate object. Think carefully about digital media also – if you want to create a memorable and immersive experience, can you do that with visitors looking at a 7-inch screen in their palms? And if they can, why would they bother leaving their sofa?

View all the 2015 winners.

Museums + Heritage Awards

It’s that time of the year again and the with the The Museums + Heritage Awards just around the corner there’s not much time to submit an entry. The aim of the awards is to celebrate best practice within the world of museums, galleries, cultural and heritage visitor attractions, attracting hundreds of entries which battle it out to win one of 11 prestigious awards. The entry deadline is on Wednesday 1st February.

For details on all of the award categories and info on how to submit an entry visit the Museums + Heritage Awards site.

Jodi Awards 2017

Applications for the Jodi Awards 2017 are now invited. The ‘Jodis’, as they are affectionately known, recognise the best use of digital technology in widening access to information, collections, learning and creativity for disabled people in museums, galleries, heritage sites, libraries and archives. Museums, galleries, heritage sites, libraries and archives from all countries can apply for an award. 

The Jodi Mattes Trust welcomes applications from organisations of all sizes, for low-tech and hi-tech projects and for small or large audiences. What matters is the quality of your project. The Jodi Awards are given in memory of Jodi Mattes (1973-2001). Jodi was a tireless champion of equal access to culture and the Awards were set up to celebrate her passion and energy. In her career at the British Museum and RNIB, her work focused on improving the visitor experience to cultural activities for disabled people and the importance of involving disabled people in programme and project development.

If you are planning to apply for an Award, please let us know by sending an email entitled ‘Expression of Interest’ to info@jodiawards.org.uk.  In this email please state the name of your organisation and the title of your project. This information will help us track incoming applications. 

For more information and to download an application form, please visit our new website jodiawards.org.uk/apply.

Application deadline 27 January 2017.

Art Fund Museum of the Year 2017

Art Fund have just opened applications for their annual Museum of the Year prize. Each year, Art Fund award one museum a prize of £100,000 for their achievements over the preceding year, while each of the other finalists receives £10,000 in recognition of their success. Applications close 7th February 2017 with the announcement made on 5th July 2017.

For more information visit the Art Fund website.

The Marsh Awards for Palaeontology and Mineralogy 2016

From the National History Museum:

The Marsh Awards recognise unsung heroes who have made a major contribution to the promotion of palaeontology or mineralogy in the UK and abroad. 

These contributions could include:

  • popular publications
  • websites
  • collecting and donation of natural history collections to museums
  • superb preparation or conservation of specimens in public collections
  • artistic or technical innovations

The awards

Two awards will be presented:

  • The Marsh Award for Palaeontology
  • The Marsh Award for Mineralogy

The recipient(s) of each award will receive a certificate and a £1,000 prize.

The awards ceremony will be in the Flett Theatre of the Natural History Museum in London on 6 February 2017. The event is free but registration is required. Please complete and submit the form below by 31 January 2017.

Nominations and deadline

Nominations will be accepted for groups or individuals. Groups are eligible for self-nomination.

Please complete the appropriate nomination form and send to M.Richter@nhm.ac.uk, attaching the independent letters of support. The deadline for nominations is 20 December 2016.

More about the Marsh Awards

The awards are the creation of Brian Marsh OBE, chairman of the Marsh Christian Trust, who wanted a vehicle to recognise ‘unsung heroes and heroines’, people who are passionate about what they do and devote their time to improving the world and our knowledge of it.

Since the Trust was established in 1981, the number of organisations it supports each year has grown from eight to over 400. In 2015 the Awards recognised over 150 individuals or groups in the worldwide, applauding their voluntary, professional and group contributions across the fields of social welfare, conservation, the arts and heritage.

– See more at: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/our-science/science-events/marsh-awards-2016.html#sthash.qINq3sUF.dpuf

Marsh Trust Volunteer Awards – Deadline Extended

Deadline: 29 July 2016

The application deadline has been extended for this year’s Volunteers for Museum Learning Award, presented by The British Museum and The Marsh Christian Trust.  The award celebrates the contribution of volunteers in museums, galleries and heritage sites all over the United Kingdom, recognising their achievements and dedication as well as the innovative ways they are engaging with the visiting public.  

There will be twelve regional winners, each of whom will receive a £500 cash prize. Additionally, an overall national winner will receive a further £2,000. The awards will be presented at the British Museum in September.  If volunteers are too modest to apply themselves, museums are very welcome to apply on their behalf. To find out more and to submit an application please visit the British Museum website here.