Tagged: Health and Wellbeing

Learning Matters – North West Health and Care Awards 2017

The search is on for people and projects where individual and organisational learning is driving development and transforming the health and care sector in the North West. We want to hear about the part museums can and do play!

Health Education England and Voluntary Sector North West are particularly keen to receive nominations from museums which are working in partnership with either health and /or care partners to deliver innovative project work in the region and to understand this commitment to contributing to individual and community wellbeing. They would like to hear about museum innovation and the people who make this happen. They would also like to hear about how museum work is transforming the lives of the people you touch through your programmes and activity.

These awards will highlight what can be done to enable people to have the knowledge, skills and confidence to play an active role in managing their own health and wellbeing; and how through cross sector, collaborative working partners can effectively support communities and help them harness their assets.

If you want more information on award themes, award categories and how to get nominating now go to: https://www.vsnw.org.uk/nw-health-awards-2017

AGE FRIENDLY MUSEUMS NETWORK CROSS-SECTOR CONFERENCE

Thursday 16th February 2017

 9.30-16.30 at the British Museum, London

Join them to explore current age friendly thinking and practice in museums developed through cross-sector collaborations.

For full event details follow this link:

afmn-conference-schedule

Book your free place through Eventbrite:

https://agefriendlymuseumsconference.eventbrite.co.uk

Museums for Health and Wellbeing Conference

Monday 6th March
Thackray Museum, Leeds

The National Alliance for Museums, Health and Wellbeing is very pleased to be holding its second conference at the Thackray Medical Museum in Leeds. The programme will feature speakers from the health, social care and museum sectors who will explore the contribution museums can make to health and wellbeing from a range of different perspectives. This one-day event is aimed at museum professionals looking to develop their health and wellbeing offer as well as those interested in working in partnership with museums including health and social care workers, artists and art-therapy practitioners. 

Tickets are £30 and can be booked by visiting:

museumsandwellbeingalliance.wordpress.com

Museums and Wellbeing Week

6-12 March 2017

The Alliance is also coordinating the second National Museums & Wellbeing Week from 6 -12 March 2017. This will be an opportunity for museums to showcase their health and wellbeing offer and raise awareness of this valuable area of work. 

Further details of how you can get involved can be found by visiting:

museumsandwellbeingalliance.wordpress.com/news

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme 2017 – Last few places

Museums are increasingly delivering health and wellbeing programmes as part of their core offer and the impact they have can be huge on the participants. This new Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme will look at a number of projects museums in the North West are delivering and will inform participants on how to develop their own.

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme Workshop 1 – Mindfulness
Tuesday 31st January 2017

Manchester Art Gallery
10:00 – 16:00
FREE
One ticket remaining

This first session as part of the programme will focus on the mindfulness work Manchester Art Gallery does as part of their public programmes. During the morning we will hear about the background to the work along with planning and research done and in the afternoon we will experience one of their mindfulness workshops with an artist.

To book a place visit the eventbrite page

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme Workshop 2 – Working in Hospitals
Monday 20th February 2017
Whitworth Art Gallery
11:15 – 16:00
FREE
Two tickets remaining

This second session as part of the programme will focus on the the work the Whitworth Art Gallery does with the local hospital service. We will also hear from the national Paintings in Hospitals Programme about the work they to and how you can get involved. Lastly we will have the opportunity to experience one of the sessions that the Whitworth Art Gallery runs with hospital patients.

To book a place visit the eventbrite page

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme Workshop 3 – Dementia
Thursday 16th March 2017
Nantwich Museum
11:00 – 16:00
FREE
Six tickets remaining

This final session as part of the programme will focus on the the work the Nantwich Museum does with dementia patients. During the morning we will hear about the background to the work along with planning and research done and in the afternoon we will participate in the excellent Dementia Friend training.

To book a place visit the eventbrite page

If you have any questions please contact Alex Bird – alexander.bird@manchester.ac.uk

What is the Mindful Museum?

From Manchester Art Gallery:

For the past four years we have been developing mindfulness across our learning programmes and with different audiences, we have explored just how this valuable skill can be employed in the appreciation of art. In this way, we have helped people to engage more fully with our permanent collection as well as with our special exhibitions. In encountering familiar works as well as art that is entirely new to them, they have been able to reflect upon the importance of their own mental health.

Our learners

The people we work with are invited to learn, develop and practise it within our gallery walls. Our learners includes adult mental health service users, primary school children, older people, newly qualified teachers and the long-term unemployed. Through our projects and public workshops, we have been helping people to appreciate that mindfulness is both life-long and life-wide. But the most important outcome is that they are encouraged to develop it independently in their everyday lives.

A person may choose to be mindful at home, in their garden or at work and many have told us of the joy that the practice can bring in such settings. Additionally, people have reported on the usefulness of bringing mindful awareness to their workplaces as well as on the value of practising it on a busy tram!

And so the process begins in the gallery but it does not end there; the practice of letting thoughts come and go while looking at a painting, without getting caught up or carried away by them, can be transferred to real life situations.

Adults and communities

Our work with mental health service users saw mindfulness provide a much needed tool they when they were coping with difficult emotions and thoughts. It seems to give people something to draw upon whenever they feel overwhelmed by the events of their day. A resource for recovery on the journey back to good mental health.

In our work with public sector workers, we have seen that mindfulness can help people respond to the challenging changes they face and over which they feel that they have little control.

Our drop-in lunchtime sessions have provided city-workers with important nourishment as well as respite from the noise and over-stimulation of the modern world. This gives them a moment away from the many pressures of their working environments. Mindfulness can be used as a preventative measure, protecting and strengthening  people’s mental health by helping them learn skills to manage stress better and thereby lowering the risk of developing a mental health problem.

Schools

Similarly our work with schools has shown that mindfulness can help children to build up emotional resilience and self-worth. Thus empowered, they are more inclined to accept and value themselves for being just the way they are. With a quarter of a million children accessing mental health services in England today, we believe mindfulness is a necessary skill for children and young people today to learn in order to flourish and thrive as adults.

Older people

Older people have told us that mindfulness has helped them to see life in a new way and how they have become more aware of the curious, the strange and the beautiful. They are therefore enriched by the realisation that irrespective of age, there is still so much left to see and appreciate in the world. And they are able to do this with a renewed sense of wonder.

The future

Having integrated mindfulness across our learning strands and with a mindfulness-based public health and wellbeing programme that is accessible to everyone, we would like to share our learning and experience with other museums and galleries. As The Mindful Museum we will raise awareness of the clinical evidence behind the practice and its impact on health, creativity and learning. In our studios, we will share practical ways for other museum and gallery professionals to integrate mindfulness into their programmes through a series of Continued Professional Development sessions. And, of course, we look forward to learning from others so that we can continue to develop our knowledge and improve our understanding in this field.

A mindful city is a healthy, resilient city

Most importantly, we will continue to support people to learn this wellbeing skill so that they can effect real and long-lasting change in their own health and wellbeing. In other words, as The Mindful Museum, we will continue to invite the people of Manchester to be mindful, one painting at a time.

#MAGwellbeing

Arts and Dementia Masterclass

Saturday 21 January 2017
Collective Encounters, Liverpool

Over the past 6 year Collective Encounters has amassed considerable experience working in the field of arts and dementia. We have delivered a long-term programme of creative arts workshops with people with dementia and their carers in community and care home settings; toured performances in care homes; developed performance work to be used in a training context for health care professionals and delivered a training programme for carers in how to use the arts more effectively in their work. We have supported this practical work with an extensive research programme that began with a full literature review of academic and grey literature dealing with best practice and the benefits of arts and dementia. Publications include: Arts and Dementia: a summary report, A pocket guide to arts activities for people with dementia and a series of advice sheets for artists.

This is a full-day training session introducing experienced artists to working with people with dementia. Training methodology will involve tutor presentation, group discussion and action learning sets. Participants will be provided with high quality materials to take away with them to support and remind them of their learning.

Find out more and book a place at:

collective-encounters.org.uk/2016/10/arts-and-dementia-master-class

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme 2017

Museums are increasingly delivering health and wellbeing programmes as part of their core offer and the impact they have can be huge on the participants. This new Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme will look at a number of projects museums in the North West are delivering and will inform participants on how to develop their own.

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme Workshop 1 – Mindfulness
Tuesday 31st January 2017

Manchester Art Gallery
10:00 – 16:00
FREE

This first session as part of the programme will focus on the mindfulness work Manchester Art Gallery does as part of their public programmes. During the morning we will hear about the background to the work along with planning and research done and in the afternoon we will experience one of their mindfulness workshops with an artist.

To book a place visit the eventbrite page

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme Workshop 2 – Working in Hospitals
Monday 20th February 2017
Whitworth Art Gallery
11:15 – 16:00
FREE

This second session as part of the programme will focus on the the work the Whitworth Art Gallery does with the local hospital service. We will also hear from the national Paintings in Hospitals Programme about the work they to and how you can get involved. Lastly we will have the opportunity to experience one of the sessions that the Whitworth Art Gallery runs with hospital patients.

To book a place visit the eventbrite page

Health and Wellbeing in Museums Programme Workshop 3 – Dementia
Thursday 16th March 2017
Nantwich Museum
11:00 – 16:00
FREE

This final session as part of the programme will focus on the the work the Nantwich Museum does with dementia patients. During the morning we will hear about the background to the work along with planning and research done and in the afternoon we will participate in the excellent Dementia Friend training.

To book a place visit the eventbrite page

If you have any questions please contact Alex Bird – alexander.bird@manchester.ac.uk

CPD – An Art Therapy Journey

This blog details my journey from being interested in Art Therapy to wanting to pursue a career in the area in the near future. I’ve been extremely lucky to have the support and opportunity to find out more about Art Therapy and the role of the therapist in this 5 day foundation course.

For an art therapist the image is always the starting point to working with a client. Understanding and knowing a client is key to working in an effective way with them, as well as understanding their psychological challenges an art therapist also has to take into account the types of materials they use, whether the client can/is willing to get messy, how they’re feeling in that exact moment, they’re creative background and much more.

First and foremost I have to thank MDNW & Gallery Oldham for supporting me to complete the course. I’ve always been extremely interested in Art Therapy ever since one of the last art classes in year 11 and we looked at career pathways in the arts.
I would also like to thank Paula Gillespie – Fotheringham for delivering such a well thought out, provocative, enjoyable and inspiring course and all of my course mates who were always inquisitive, welcoming, happy and dedicated.

The course was split over two weeks, 3 days in the first and 2 in the second.
This split gave us all the breathing space needed to process everything we had learnt. As well as a theoretical course it was also quite an emotionally draining one and I think we all benefitted from having the time and the space to reflect. We learnt the ins and outs of Art Therapy, what is and isn’t expected from a therapist, what materials are best for which clients, the importance of choosing the correct material and how to develop a client’s confidence using a creative therapy. We looked at a number of different approaches but focussed on the client centered approach. Ultimately what all of the approaches agree on is supporting a client to set comfortable and sometimes changing goals for themselves and successfully achieve them.

The course leader Paula created a safe and welcoming environment right from the beginning. Her knowledge, passion, wealth of experience and flexibility made it extremely easy to learn everything in such a short space of time. It was obvious she wanted to share her wealth of knowledge with the group and as she’s worked in a variety of settings from one on one client based to psychiatric wards in prisons etc. she was able to give us a well-informed insight into the sector.

Personally, one of the most interesting and unique elements of the course were the self-reflection and self-care components. It’s rare to have the opportunity to focus on yourself so at first it felt strange and selfish but this is obviously an essential in therapy. It goes without saying on a course like this with so many experiential workshops and self-reflection opportunities it’s easy to share and feel quite vulnerable but as a group we bonded extremely well which made it all the easier to share in a supportive environment.
By the end of the course I think we all understood the importance of giving yourself time to reflect on who you are. It’s definitely something I’m going to try and give myself more time to do.

As a gallery and museum organisation, and sector as a whole really, I can easily see the benefit Art Therapy can have on our sector. Many galleries now see the benefit the arts can have on Health and Wellbeing, especially on developing resilience and positive mental health/attitudes. Although there are lots of similarities between arts for health and Art Therapy there are many and major differences. But I believe both can benefit from each other and develop new skills from learning off one another.
With some of the skills and ideas we learnt from the course I feel comfortable implementing them and using them in a workshop setting.
Some of the simple ice breakers like ‘The squiggle game’ would be perfect for a group of teens reluctant and worried that they’re art work wouldn’t be good enough.

I love the ethos of Art Therapy; it isn’t about creating a beautiful image to be judged by a therapist. It’s the act of creating, taking that first step and putting mark to paper and understanding where you want to go. As part of my workshops I deliver I always want to incorporate some form of Art Therapy, whether that’s a simple ice breaker or enabling others to self-reflect as part of the creative process

I think Gallery Oldham will benefit from my taking part as I’m going to try and implement some of the essential components learnt into workshops I deliver from now on. This might be simple ice breakers as mentioned above or a deeper self-reflection activity. The course has also developed my understanding of creating a safe environment for participants, looking at what, if anything, I can do to make it an inviting space.

Luckily I’ll soon be working on a project with a registered Art Therapist linking to an upcoming exhibition. With the knowledge and learning I’ve taken away from the course I hope to be able to assist her where possible and offer a brilliant opportunity for our participants.

I feel extremely fortunate to have had this opportunity to discover more about Art Therapy and meet some brilliant people. It’s also, once again, kick-started my creativity. I’ve booked myself on to a few different creative workshops, set myself a task of doing ‘a drawing a day’ and I’m really appreciating the therapeutic wellbeing the arts can bring.

Once again, thank you to Alex Bird, MDNW, Gallery Oldham, Paula and everyone else who supported me during the course!
http://www.manchester-art-therapy.co.uk/

EvaD Ould-Okojie
Access and Interpretation Officer
Gallery Oldham

 

 

 

 

 

Arts, Health and Wellbeing

As part of an Inquiry into the role of the arts in health and social care, the All Party Parliamentary Group for Arts, Health and Wellbeing is seeking examples of the arts and culture influencing health and wellbeing outcomes. The APPG is interested in examples of practice from the past decade, where there is reasonably reliable evidence of outcomes or evidence that a pilot or new approach has promise. Submissions are invited of up to 1,000 words, arranged according to headings outlined in the guidance. For the guidance, definitions and further information about the Inquiry, please go to: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/Cultural/-/Projects/Arts,-Health-and-Wellbeing-Inquiry.aspx.  The deadline for submissions is Friday 19 August 2016.

BME Health Inequalities Conference

Richmond Hall, Lomax Street, Rochdale
Thursday 5th February 2015
10am – 3pm

Please find attached a flyer for a BME Health Inequalities Event which is being organised by the Rochdale Women’s Welfare Association and sponsored by the Strategic Clinical Network.  If you would like to attend the event on the 5th February 2015 then you can register a place by emailing mina@rwwa.co.uk .  Please note that this event is aimed at women and their health.