Carbon Literacy workshops – places remaining

There are a small number of places left on our Carbon Literacy workshops running in November. Our full day workshops, delivered either by MDNW staff or our network of Carbon Literacy trainers, are open to any staff, volunteers or trustees in any Accredited museum (or museum working towards Accreditation) in the North West, or any staff from a recognised organisation that supports the museums in our region.

The remaining workshop dates available are:

To book a place on any of these click on the date of the workshop. Bookings will close on 27th October.

Since 2016 MDNW has been working with the Carbon Literacy Project and is one of only four organisations to be recognised as a Carbon Literacy Training Organisation. We, and our network of trainers from museums across the region, have run the training to nearly 300 people. We have also given advice to other sector support organisations and museums across England and Wales wanting to roll out Carbon Literacy themselves.

The Carbon Literacy project aims to give 1 million people a day’s worth of Carbon Literacy training.

The workshop will give you an understanding of what climate change is, the scale of its effects, and how museums fit into the global, national and local picture to address climate change. You will become Carbon Literate by making an individual pledge, and an organisational pledge to take back to your museum, of what you can do, and is in your power to achieve, to make a significant difference to your carbon footprint.

In the words of a previous delegate, ‘Carbon Literacy is about understanding what I actually need to do, where I can get help to do it, actually doing it and seeing that I’ve done it.’

Job Opportunity: The Folly at Settle

Heritage Development Officer
Salary £28,000 per annum (pro rata)
Location – Settle, N Yorkshire, UK          
9 month fixed term part-time contract, 20 hours/week (may be extended to 12 months, subject to available funding) – would also consider an appointment on a consultancy basis – subject to agreement on terms

From The Folly at Settle:

The Trustees of the North Craven Building Preservation Trust (NCBPT) seek to appoint a Heritage Development Officer to assist in transforming The Folly, Settle’s only Grade I Listed building, into a sustainable heritage and arts attraction.

This is an exciting opportunity for an enterprising person to develop and deliver heritage projects at The Folly. The post-holder will work with volunteers, partner organisations, trustees and local people to shape and deliver a varied range of activities, both in The Folly and the local area. They will also seize every opportunity to raise the profile and increase the impact of The Folly and will help develop the newly-launched Supporters’ Group.

Essential requirements for this post include:

  • Track record of successful team working and project delivery
  • Understanding and experience of delivering interpretation in a heritage setting
  • Project management experience
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills
  • Ability to bring heritage to life

The Folly is a prominent and memorable local landmark, situated in the centre of Settle, close to the Market Place. It has an unusual history and both the house and collections (also known as the Museum of North Craven Life) are held in high esteem by local people. Activities and events are already run by volunteers, and this post will enable significant expansion.

The Folly is a fully Accredited independent Museum, registered charity (NCBPT) and company limited by guarantee. It is run by a team of volunteers and governed by a Board of Trustees. Our charitable objects are:

  • To preserve the built heritage in and around North Craven which is of particular beauty or historical, architectural or constructional interest
  • To acquire, preserve, document, interpret and make accessible exhibits, objects and collections relating to the social, agricultural, industrial and built environment of North Craven through provision of a museum service for the purpose of educating and informing the public

Since we opened a new Coffee House in June 2017, the building has been open almost every day and there are exciting opportunities to build a stronger and more varied range of activities and events.

For further details, please email Heather Lane (Honorary Curator) curator@ncbpt.org.uk to request an application form, role description and further particulars. Please indicate if you would also like an informal discussion before making an application, and a contact number will be provided.

Closing date: 15th November 2019 (Interviews will be held in the week commencing Monday 25th November).

Study Day: Guide Books & Exhibition Catalogues

Thursday 31st October
The Hospitium, York
10:00 – 16:00

From the Association of Cultural Enterprises:

Hear from publishing professionals at a range of venues about how to get started in print, especially if you’re a small or medium sized organisation with limited resources. Get inspired with case studies looking particularly at producing guide books and exhibition catalogues in-house.

Who is it for?

Retail, commercial and front of house managers in small to medium sized venues.

What will I learn?

• How to maximise your return by creating cost-effective designs with impact

• How to create a guide book from scratch: challenges, pitfalls and rewards

• How to create, publish and sell an exhibition catalogue, whilst minimising risk

• How to get around the limitations of a tight budget and stretched resources

• Paid for versus free guide books: why both have a place

Speakers

  • Emma Lay – Sales & Marketing Manager, King Richard III Visitor Centre
  • Susan Pacitti – Publishing & Licensing Manager, Glasgow Museums
  • Malcolm Crampton – Director, Jigsaw Design & Publishing
  • Rory Hill – Visitor Services & Retail Manager, Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
  • Kieran Whitworth – Manager of Book Buying & Trade Sales, Imperial War Museums
  • Susan Hornby – Head of Education & Community Engagement, The Deep

For the full programme and info on ticket prices, click here.

Guest Post – An introduction to Bid-writing and Arts Funding

By Laura H Drane www.lauraHdrane.com @LauraHD
Oct 2019

So you’ve got an idea, and you need some financial help getting it off the ground. Where could you get access to some money and how do you put yourself in the best position to be successful?

TYPES AND SOURCES OF FUNDING

The first thing to think about is different sources of potential funding and what’s in your mix (being aware that in some cases it’s originated from the same source but channelled through different routes).

Public or statutory funds might be accessed through local authorities, government departments, one of the Arts Councils or the National Lottery’s distributors like the Heritage Fund or Community Fund.

Private funds might come from companies, trusts and foundations, or individuals. Businesses tend to support in one of three ways – cash sponsorship, corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes, or in-kind or pro bono support (free stuff or free advice/ expertise). Trusts and foundations would cover everything from the multi-million pound heavyweights like the Wellcome Trust, through to a much smaller charity set up for a specific locality or in memory of a local person.

Individual giving is still alive and well. It can be small or large, regular or one-off, online or in person. Examples include friends’ or membership schemes, crowdfunding or online platforms like Patreon, an online donate button, a collection box, legacies/bequests, a gift from a major donor. And traditional fundraising is still effective – think how many times you’ve been asked to sponsor someone to do something or buy a raffle ticket or come to a gala event or bid in a silent auction or contribute to a bake off.

Sometimes earning a bit more income can seem easier than all of these other routes – you’re potentially more in control of it and can play to your strengths. That might mean running an extra paid-for workshop, selling some more tickets, making some merch, or hiring out that asset.

A few other routes may include: academic Research Councils, BIDs/ LEPs, loans from banks, angel investors, and more. For up-to-date information about UK-EU funding see www.creativeeuropeuk.eu

Last but not least – want some free money from HMRC? Make sure you claim Gift Aid if you’re eligible, and also look at what creative/ cultural tax reliefs are currently provided, for anything from R&D and innovation, to production/ touring.

FROM APPLICATION TO EVALUATION

If you’re going to have to write something to get this financial support – be it a request letter or a formal bid or application – then bear some of these tips in mind:

  • Plan WELL in advance; in most cases you’ll need months to research, plan and apply
  • Think laterally and creatively about your applications – to whom might you apply and for what?
  • Be realistic because competition is stiff and funds are limited – you’ll have to sell yourself and stand out to be in with a chance
  • Stay focussed on your project aim(s) by not just chasing the money, and do sell the benefits both to you and the funder

If you are sure that an application to a funder is the right thing for you, make sure you do your research – what are their aims, when are the deadlines, what are their applications processes, have they got limits for the amounts they award, do they want match-funding, how long will it take them to decide and let you know, etc? Most importantly, try to think about it from their position – they have a vision and goals, and give away money to try and achieve those, and if they choose to fund you, you are helping them do that.

Early on in your planning, be sure to draw up an accurate budget (inc contingency, plus any cash match and in-kind support). Check what they will and won’t fund – for example, some have guidance on whether they will fund overheads/ core costs/ management fees, others have rules on purchasing capital items.

Applications come in a huge variety of different styles and forms – be sure to only submit whatever the funder wants to see! Most now are via an online portal but some still want a two-page letter, a business plan, or even a meet-and-greet. Occasionally they will expect you to complete a first stage application before proceeding to a second round. Never aim to submit right on the deadline – try to give yourself a day or even a week’s grace! And try to keep an up-to-date folder of useful docs to hand (eg insurance certificates, annual reports/ accounts) as this saves you having to hunt all of those attachments out each time.

So you’ve done your research, found a match, made the application, and had the notice that you’ve been successful! Well done! Now what? Once you’ve been notified, accept their terms, and do write and say thank you! When the payment schedule has been agreed, ensure that you appropriately credit the funder with their logo or tag line in any publicity or when promoting the project more generally.

In terms of evaluation and reporting, almost every funder will want a written submission about your work after completion (usually withholding a % of your funds until received). Make sure you find out what information they will want after the end of the project/work IN ADVANCE to ensure that you keep the right records as you go. Do invite them to any public events or performances, and keep them in the loop during the project, especially if you have to make changes. They’re unlikely to ask for their money back; more likely they will want to understand why your plans had to change to learn lessons. 

SOME OTHER DOS AND DON’TS, TIPS AND TRICKS

  • Carefully read ALL their guidance. If in doubt, and if they invite contact, then phone or email them to check before wasting their time and yours.
  • Even if you involve others in generating ideas for what you might write, always only have one author. You can immediately tell as the reader if one person answered this question and another that.
  • Work in partnership or collaborate with another organisation. Even more so these days, funders like to see their money go further and help more people and a partnership can do that (and maybe consider writing a “pre-nup” in advance in case it doesn’t go smoothly).
  • No two funders are the same – so don’t risk sending identical information to them all.
  • Be careful about “double-funding” – the nice problem of being so successful that you get two or more lots of funding for exactly the same project/ work. If this happens (unlikely, but it does!), be sure to contact both funders and tell them – they might let you keep both awards and expand the project accordingly.
  • Do keep a record of all your research into funders and their schemes if you can even if you don’t apply now – it will help when you might want to remember and consider applying with something else in the future.
  • Ideally after you’ve written your text, you get an external reader who doesn’t know much about your idea to read it and ask you questions to help you understand what came across/ what didn’t. Otherwise, build in enough time to leave it for a day or two to come back to it fresh. Lastly if time is really tight, then read it out loud to yourself from a screen or printed copy – it really does work!
  • Remember that every funder is basically looking for a good idea that will be well managed and give value for money. Some will also take interest in whether others are investing in you or will do so if you get an award, because that shows competence.

THINKING ABOUT HOW TO WRITE  

Putting fingers to keyboard can seem daunting but hopefully these tips might make the act of writing flow a bit more easily:

  • Acknowledge that you have a preferred writing style, tone, voice and work with it by trying to be consistent, rather than trying to change it too much
  • Mirror key words from their guidance or questions back to them in your answers
  • Use bullet points to break up text and help reduce word/ character counts
  • Make sure your application is a mix of story and stats – an application with all narrative and no evidence or research or SMART targets is flimsy
  • Remember that all funders are interested in your creds and experience yes, but are funding you to go from where you are now to over there in the future – don’t overly dwell on past glories
  • If you’re struggling to covey something or it’s all superlatives (innovative, unique, incredible) try to give clarity using: “For example…”

In short, think about this like a job application – you want to stand out for all the right reasons; you wouldn’t send the same covering letter to McDonalds and Deloitte so don’t just cut and paste; demonstrate how you meet their person spec and job description so that they can choose you to help them achieve the organisation’s goals; etc.

To conclude, almost every funder of any sort that I’ve worked with in the last 20 years has wanted to see evidence of need and potential for impact. And no you don’t need a professional bidwriter or fundraiser – do it yourself, build your research, hone your skills and if you really want to involve someone like that, keep your costs down and ask them to proof a major draft and ask questions/ give feedback. Good luck!

Other information, links and advice

Freelance Opportunity: Wordsworth Trust

Call for Artist: The Wordsworths’ Moss Hut
Salary: £14,000 budget
Location: Cumbria
Hours: Part Time – project based Contract: fixed term to May 2020
Closing date: 27th November 2019

From The Wordsworth Trust:

The Wordsworth Trust is looking for an artist to create a new interpretation of the Moss Hut built by William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy. This Moss Hut will be the centre of an exciting community arts engagement project that will inspire communities worldwide to explore their own creativity and love of nature.

We are looking for an imaginative response that brings alive the spirit of the original hut. This new hut should embody the creative, social and environmental spirit of the original building through the creation of a portable hut to be erected at the newly redeveloped Wordsworth Trust site in Grasmere, due to open in April 2020. This new Moss Hut, designed for a contemporary audience, will act as the catalyst and inspiration for a wide-ranging engagement project, supporting community groups, schools and organisations to make their own Moss Huts, wherever they are in the world. This is a unique opportunity to inspire communities to engage with and gain greater appreciation for nature, wellbeing and creativity and bring attention to Wordsworth’s wish that people live in harmony with nature rather than destroying it.

A budget of £14,000 is available for the cost of this project. This breaks down into £8,000 of artists fees and £6,000 for materials and the creation of the Moss Hut.

For the full brief please click here.

Key dates for submission:

Tuesday 1st October 2019 – Brief open for submissions

Thursday 31st October 2019 (Optional) – Reimagining Wordsworth Open Day on site to welcome artists, answer questions about the brief and learn more about the project. This will be an informal drop in held between 2.00pm – 5.00pm at Dove Cottage, Grasmere, LA22 9SH.

Please create a proposal, including a statement of interest and examples of previous work, to hollie@culturesyndicates.co.uk by midnight on 27 November 2019.

Interviews will be held early December 2019.

In case of questions about submission timings or for further details regarding the Reimagining Wordsworth Open Day to be held on 31st October, please contact Marie Batty, (m.batty@wordsworth.org.uk) Senior Project Administrator, Reimagining Wordsworth Tel 07940031814

Job opportunity: Curator of Art, Blackburn Museum & Art Gallery and Turton Tower

Curator of Art 

£27,905 – £31,371 per annum, pro rata

22.2 hours per week

Blackburn with Darwen Council are looking for an experienced museum professional to join their small team at Blackburn Museum and Art gallery and Turton Tower. You will be responsible for caring for, make accessible and engaging audiences with the art collections including the Hart collection of early printed books and manuscripts and Lewis collection of over 1000 Japanese woodblock prints. You will need to have experience of Interpretation, curatorial care of collections and working with communities, academics and as a flexible member of a small team. 

Candidates will hold a relevant degree and a post-graduate qualification in Museum Studies.

Closing date: 7 November 2019

Interviews:     15 November 2019          

For more information and to apply: https://jobs.blackburn.gov.uk/wrl/pages/vacancy.jsf?latest=A0005164

 

Collections Trust Conference Blog 2 – Keywords: Finding the right words to find the right records

I was fortunate to win a bursary from MDNW to attend the recent Collections Trust Conference held at New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, Leicester. The conference theme of Keywords was particularly well-timed, as I am currently overseeing a project to inventory the four main stores here at Haworth Art Gallery, Accrington. Slide1

Jane Seddon from Northampton Museums and Art Gallery had some great advice regarding training documentation volunteers. Jane told us about Virtually Shoes, a project to put their collection online, and how they created a catalogue template to meet their users’ needs. She spoke about the difficulties of documenting a specialist collection with volunteers who weren’t experts in the field. The solution was lots and lots of photographs! These were used to help the documentation volunteers identify different manufacturing techniques and to use the correct terminology. Jane also discussed the importance of clearly explaining to volunteers, who may have found continuously repeating themselves rather tedious, why consistency and repetition of keywords is vital.

Helen Johnson from West Midlands Museum Development gave an interesting talk about their project, Revealing Hidden Histories, which partnered museums with subject specialists. Helen spoke about the lack of specialist knowledge, particularly in ethnology, in museums that often have varied collections, and how this leads to some objects never being displayed because there is a fear of misrepresentation and causing offence. The result of this project was that collections staff developed knowledge of their collections that could then be utilised for exhibitions and documentation, and gained an understanding of the correct terminology meaning objects could be confidently interpreted and catalogued.

Having visited Amsterdam many times, I was particularly interested in hearing Marjolein Stege, from the Van Gogh Museum, talk about her work to integrate ‘soft’ keywords into a thesaurus, allowing online visitors to search the collections using emotive terms, rather than the usual object, material or technical keywords. As Marjolein asserted, we engage with art on an emotional level, so it makes sense to be able to search a collection using these terms.

Pam Young closed the conference with a very entertaining commentary about her mission to identify all the public locations at the V&A. After realising that the paper map, online map, visitor wayfinding, and online catalogue contradicted each other, Pam conducted a physical inventory of the locations and found a plethora of discrepancies, including rooms that had more than one name, and even some names that belonged to more than one room… I think we all felt much more confident about the documentation of our own collections after hearing about Pam’s experience!

Alison Iddon, Senior Gallery Assistant & Collections Support
Haworth Art Gallery, Accrington

 

Free workshop for Cumbrian museums: A Welcome Difference

28th November, 10am to 4pm

Dove Cottage Learning Space, Grasmere

The Cumbria Museum Consortium has organised a full-day workshop for Cumbrian museum colleagues interested in ensuring adults and children with autism have the best experience of our museums.

What do you understand by the term ‘autism’? How do we welcome visitors with autism most effectively? Have you thought about autism from the perspectives of colleagues or creative practitioners? How is the difference of autism itself welcome in our museums?

A range of people will be presenting, all of whom are speaking about autism from a personal or professional viewpoint.

Dr Kate Fox, Poet and Stand-up Comedian with autism https://katefoxwriter.wordpress.com/

Alan Gillon, museum colleague from The Beacon in Whitehaven

Sarah Johnson, Head of Learning Support & Strategic Resourced Provision for Autism, Cockermouth School

Parents of autistic children in conversation with Kate Parry

The Triple A team – a group of young adults from Triple A, Penrith

Ali McCaw, Artistic Director, Prism Arts

To book a place visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/a-welcome-difference-tickets-73469823219

NB: If you have any access or dietary requirements, please contact Kate Parry (Manager, Cumbria Museum Consortium) to let us know on kate.parry@tulliehouse.org RBB10920

For more information see the flyer.

Carbon Literacy workshops, November 2019

In June 2019 the UK  government set a legally binding target to achieve net zero CLTO Logogreenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Two-thirds of Britons agree that the planet is in a climate emergency. Schoolchildren in the UK and around the world have taken to the streets to voice their growing alarm. Museums, big and small, must play their part in addressing climate change if they are to stay relevant to their visitors.

4-8th November 2019 was originally designated as the UK’s second Green GB Week; a week of events and activities inspiring businesses, schools, colleges, universities, community groups and charities to take action on tackling climate change. As part of this MDNW made the pledge that, during Green GB Week, there would be a Carbon Literacy workshop running within 40 miles of every Accredited museum in the North West.

Due to Brexit Green GB Week has been rescheduled to early next year, but as climate change hasn’t been postponed, we will continue our offer of Carbon Literacy workshops across the region.

Our full day workshops, delivered either by MDNW staff or our network of Carbon Literacy trainers, are open to any staff, volunteers or trustees in any Accredited museum (or museum working towards Accreditation) in the North West, or any staff from a recognised organisation that supports the museums in our region.

The remaining workshop dates available are:

To book a place on any of these click on the date of the workshop.

Since 2016 MDNW has been working with the Carbon Literacy Project and is one of only four organisations to be recognised as a Carbon Literacy Training Organisation. We, and our network of trainers from museums across the region, have run the training to nearly 300 people. We have also given advice to other sector support organisations and museums across England and Wales wanting to roll out Carbon Literacy themselves.

The Carbon Literacy project aims to give 1 million people a day’s worth of Carbon Literacy training.

The workshop will give you an understanding of what climate change is, the scale of its effects, and how museums fit into the global, national and local picture to address climate change. You will become Carbon Literate by making an individual pledge, and an organisational pledge to take back to your museum, of what you can do, and is in your power to achieve, to make a significant difference to your carbon footprint.

In the words of a previous delegate, ‘Carbon Literacy is about understanding what I actually need to do, where I can get help to do it, actually doing it and seeing that I’ve done it.’

 

 

 

 

MDNW Organisational Health and Wellbeing Programme

Museum Development North West

Funded by MDNW and delivered by ABL Health, this programme will offer you support to understand the Health & Wellbeing of your museums’ greatest assets, your staff and volunteers.

The aim of the programme is to support museums to actively make improvements to the way they work, to support the improvement of staff and volunteer health and wellbeing.

What to Expect

ABL will work with you to review your organisational needs, and help you identify your key strengths and areas of concern. e.g.

  • Staff Sickness Absence
  • Productivity
  • Health & Safety
  • Policy and Procedures
  • Training plan and needs
  • Communication Systems

Using this information and key public health data about the communities surrounding your location, we will tailor our lifestyle survey to assess the health and wellbeing status, needs and desires of your staff and volunteers.

All information provided by them will be anonymised to avoid identifying individuals, giving confidence to provide honest…

View original post 195 more words